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Posts Tagged ‘Ash Wednesday’

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Valentine’s Day and the Ash Wednesday holiday marking the start of Lent fall on the same day for the first time since World War Two. The last time this convergence of holidays happened was in 1945.

Given the differing traditions of the two occasions, being that Ash Wednesday requires fasting and Valentine’s Day usually involves some sort of festive meal or chocolates. I think the only abstinence required every lent, is refraining from eating meat.

Valentine’s Day, also called Saint Valentine’s Day or the Feast of Saint Valentine, is celebrated annually on February 14.Valentine’s Day symbols that are used today include the heart-shaped outline, sweets, chocolates, red roses, doves, and the figure of the winged Cupid.

Ash Wednesday’s penance, reflection and mourning, marking the start of Lent’s 40 days, which mirror the 40 days Jesus spent fasting.

The ashes used on Ash Wednesday are made from the burning of palms from Palm Sunday the year before.

“Remember you are dust and unto dust you shall return,” priests tell parishioners.

The Lenten season to me is like a renewal of love, Jesus Christ dying for us for Love.

The ultimate theme of Valentine’s Day is romance. In its ideal form, Love

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17036693_10210133822355057_1056430999_oThis Wednesday marks the first day of March and the first day of Lent. Since Lent represents the time that Jesus spent wandering in the wilderness, it’s an understandably solemn time. While worshippers are encouraged to reflect upon their commitment to their faith and the community throughout the season, Ash Wednesday services place a special emphasis on mortality and sinfulness. That’s where the actual ashes come in.

“Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” Usually, the minister recite these words while administering the ashes. Depending on the Mass, ministers will either sprinkle ashes over worshippers’ heads or use a blend of ash and holy water to rub the sign of the cross into their foreheads.

The ashes themselves come from the palm leaves that were blessed during Palm Sunday (the Sunday before Easter) of the previous year.

Tradition holds that Christians wear ashes on the first day of Lent in order to mourn and acknowledge the suffering that Jesus endured. As a gesture, it represents a willingness to repent for your sins and purify your soul in preparation for his resurrection.

Worshippers may wash off their ashes right after services or leave them on for the rest of the day. Traditionally, it’s frowned upon to go out in public with your ashes on display, but nowadays it’s pretty common to do so.

Have a blessed Ash Wednesday everyone !

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By Dr. Richard P. Bucher

Ash Wednesday is the name given to the first day of the season of Lent, in which the Pastor applies ashes to the foreheads of Christians to signify an inner repentance. But what is the history and the meaning of this Christian holy day?

Ash_Wed_Header(1)Ash Wednesday, originally called dies cinerum (day of ashes) is mentioned in the earliest copies of the Gregorian Sacramentary, and probably dates from at least the 8th Century. One of the earliest descriptions of Ash Wednesday is found in the writings of the Anglo-Saxon abbot Aelfric (955-1020). In his Lives of the Saints, he writes, “We read in the books both in the Old Law and in the New that the men who repented of their sins bestrewed themselves with ashes and clothed their bodies with sackcloth. Now let us do this little at the beginning of our Lent that we strew ashes upon our heads to signify that we ought to repent of our sins during the Lenten fast.” Aelfric then proceeds to tell the tale of a man who refused to go to church for the ashes and was accidentally killed several days later in a boar hunt! This quotation confirms what we know from other sources, that throughout the Middle Ages ashes were sprinkled on the head, rather than anointed on the forehead as in our day.

As Aelfric suggests, the pouring of ashes on one’s body (and dressing in sackcloth, a very rough material) as an outer manifestation of inner repentance or mourning is an ancient practice. It is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. What is probably the earliest occurrence is found at the very end of the book of Job. Job, having been rebuked by God, confesses, “Therefore I despise myself and repent in dust and ashes” (Job 42:6). Other examples are found in 2 Samuel 13:19, Esther 4:1,3, Isaiah 61:3, Jeremiah 6:26, Ezekiel 27:30, and Daniel 9:3. In the New Testament, Jesus alludes to the practice in Matthew 11:21: “Woe to you, Korazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! If the miracles that were performed in you had been performed in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.”

In the typical Ash Wednesday observance, Christians are invited to the altar to receive the imposition of ashes, prior to receiving the holy Supper. The Pastor applies ashes in the shape of the cross on the forehead of each, while speaking the words, “For dust you are and to dust you shall return” (Genesis 3:19). This is of course what God spoke to Adam and Eve after they eaten of the forbidden fruit and fallen into sin. These words indicated to our first parents the bitterest fruit of their sin, namely death. In the context of the Ash Wednesday imposition of ashes, they remind each penitent of their sinfulness and mortality, and, thus, their need to repent and get right with God before it is too late. The cross reminds each penitent of the good news that through Jesus Christ crucified there is forgiveness for all sins, all guilt, and all punishment.

Many Christians choose to leave the ashes on their forehead for the remainder of the day, not to be showy and boastful (see Matthew 6:16-18). Rather, they do it as a witness that all people are sinners in need of repentance AND that through Jesus all sins are forgiven through faith.

Ash Wednesday, like the season of Lent, is never mentioned in Scripture and is not commanded by God. Christians are free to either observe or not observe it. It also should be obvious that the imposition of ashes, like similar external practices, are meaningless, even hypocritical, unless there is a corresponding inner repentance and change of behavior. This is made clear in Isaiah 58:5-7 when God says,

Is this the kind of fast I have chosen, only a day for a man to humble himself? Is it only for bowing one’s head like a reed and for lying on sackcloth and ashes ? Is that what you call a fast, a day acceptable to the LORD? 6 “Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen: to loose the chains of injustice and untie the cords of the yoke, to set the oppressed free and break every yoke? 7 Is it not to share your food with the hungry and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter– when you see the naked, to clothe him, and not to turn away from your own flesh and blood?

With this in mind, however, the rite of ashes on Ash Wednesday is heartily recommended to the Christian as a grand opportunity for repentance and spiritual renewal within the framework of confession and absolution.

A blessed Ash Wednesday observance to all.

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